Today in Theatre History: THE LIMITS OF VERISIMILITUDE ARE TESTED, May 15, 1928

On this day in theatre history (May 15, 1928), an illustrator from Chicago decided to pPlane Crazy.pngush the very limits of Neoclassical verisimilitude by showing an animated short to a selected test audience in Los Angeles.  The six-minute cartoon depicts an anthropomorphic mouse attempting to fly his own homebuilt aircraft while simultaneously harassing his rodent girlfriend. It was the first animated film to feature Mickey Mouse.  The short, entitled “Plane Crazy,” failed to pick up a distributor, however, in part because it was not a “talkie.”  So Disney produced another Mickey Mouse short, this time with sound, called “Steamboat Willie,” released November 18, 1928.  It was an instant hit and an empire was born.  “Plane Crazy” was eventually released in 1929 as the fourth in a line of early Mickey Mouse adventures.  Castlevetro would be so disappointed.

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One Response to Today in Theatre History: THE LIMITS OF VERISIMILITUDE ARE TESTED, May 15, 1928

  1. Pingback: Verily, Verily, Verisimilitude | cricketmuse

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